Thursday, December 10, 2009

Joseph Hoover & Sons

In the last blog, I talked about the wonderful print illustrated above by Joseph Hoover, a Philadelphia printmaker. Today I'll talk a bit about this publisher whose firm lasted into the early 20th century.

Joseph Hoover started by making elaborate wood frames in Philadelphia in 1856, but within a decade or so he began to produce popular prints. Initially he mostly worked for other publishers, including Duval & Hunter, and he worked with noted Philadelphia artist James F. Queen. He also issued a few hand-colored, popular prints of considerable charm (like the one illustrated above). Later he produced decorative prints in black & white and then began to work in chromolithography, winning a medal for excellence during the Centennial for his chromolithographs after Queen’s renderings.

This was just the beginning of Hoovers work in chromolithography and he became one of the few native Americans who achieved success with this process. By 1885, Hoover installed a complete printing plant for chromolithography. By the end of the century, his firm was one of the largest print publishers in the county, with an average annual production of between 600,000 to 700,000 pictures.

Using chromolithography, Hoover was able to produce attractive, colorful prints that were still affordable for anyone to use as decoration for home and office. The audience for Hoover's prints was quite wide, extending through out the United States, and abroad to Canada, Mexico, England and Germany. The subjects issued by the firm are extensive, including genre scenes, still life images, views of American locations, and generic landscapes, including a series of charming winter scenes.

111 comments:

  1. General Grant Lithograph:
    I am trying to get information on a lithograph published by Joseph Hoover entitled "General Grant and his family". I am working on a paper related to this item and the information I have includes that it was "entered according to Act of Congress 1868 by Joseph Hoover in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania; P.S. Duval, Son & Co., Lith." Any information would be appreciated.

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  2. There is really not anything you can say about it other than the general information above. Hoover produced prints on many different subjects--they were in the business of selling prints for people to hang in their homes--and political prints like this were popular at the time. Most Hoover prints do not have an artist, so if yours does not, there really is nothing more to say about it other than what you can see by looking at it.

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  3. is there any value to one of the wood frames made by j.Hoover, phalada?

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  4. I am not aware that Hoover made frames. However, in general antique frames have "some" value, but mostly not a lot. It is hard to sell an antique frame and I know of no dealers who specialize in them, though there probably are some.

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    1. • Joseph Hoover:
      Joseph Hoover started by his career making elaborate wood frames in Philadelphia in 1856, but within a decade or so he began to produce popular prints. Initially he mostly worked for other publishers, including Duval & Hunter, but he also issued a number of hand-colored, popular prints. During the Centennial, Hoover won a medal for excellence for his chromolithographs after QueenĂ¢€™s renderings, and in the 1880s, he and his sons began to print chromolithographs exclusively, with an average annual production of between 600,000 to 700,000 pictures.

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  5. Dear Chris, I have a framed picture of President James A, Garfield. The Artist is W.H. Fowels. the bottom of the lithograph says James A. Garfield twenthieth president of the united states presented by the new york tribune. I had the frame appraised, They told me it was late 1800 to early 1900. They also said it was given to a school on NDakota or Iowa? The frames was appraised at 400 dollars. It is is great shape. Would love to know more I search and search do not get any where. Thank You Irene Matheson

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  6. First off, I have to say that unless the frame is really special that I think the appraisal is high (at least as a realistic value). It is very hard to sell frames except when they are really special. They do add value to a print in an appraisal, as you would have to have a new print reframed if you were going to replace it, but $400 sounds a lot even for that. Just my thoughts, of said without seeing it, but based on a lot of experience with prints in nice old frames.

    As for the print, it was done as a bonus for reads of the New York Tribune. This is a typical thing, done a lot in the 19th and early 20th century. I have a blog about that which you can read. If you read that blog and the one about Hoover, you basically know everything there is to say about your print (or at least all we can tell you, as we are not at all familiar with the artist W.H. Fowels.)

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  7. I have a frame and chromolithograph that is by J Hoover. Between the back of the frame and the chromolithograph is also a sheet of newspaper from 1896. I want to know how I go about finding out if this is worth anything. Can you please give me some direction?
    Thanks,
    Carlise

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  8. With but a few exceptions, the Hoover prints have what we call "decorative" value. This is explained elsewhere in this blog at So, yet it probably has some value (if it is in nice shape), but no real collector's value.

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  9. Mr. Lane, I appreciate your timely response! Do you suggest I take pictures and if so, who can look at them and tell me what it is worth?
    Thanks again,
    Carlise

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  10. We are happy to look at image sent to us via regular mail (not email!). If you do send us photos, please make sure to include your email address so we can respond.

    As for telling you value, what we offer at no charge is a "ballpark valuation," which I already told you when I said it had "decorative" value. If you want an actual value, then you need to have an appraisal. We offer formal appraisals and "Professional Opinions of Value," both explained at www.philaprintshop.com/apprais.html

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  11. i have a print of "the horse fair"
    artist is rosa bonheur. in lower left corner is jos hoover&son,in an old frame. any idea how much this print is worth,and the age of it.
    email:gbeservices@live.com

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  12. The print would have been done in the 1880s or 90s. It has, like most of Hoover's prints, "decorative" value. As you can read elsewhere in this blog, this doesn't mean it isn't a nice print, just that it does not have any particular "collector" value.

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  13. Chris: My wife and I just purchased a print of James A. Garfield and Family. It is dated 1881 and we are wondering what you know about this print. It is in the original frame and glass, and says "J. Hoover, Phila, 1881" at the bottom. A framed picture of Mrs. Garfield (the President's mother) is on a table that the family is seated around, and a framed photograph of President Lincoln is prominently displayed on the wall. It is in excellent condition and was bought by an antiques dealer at an estate sale. We paid $350.00 for it. Just inquiring about both value and what you know about the circumstance of the print.

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  14. If you read the blog about Hoover, you will see that Hoover issued popular prints for the general public. That is what your print is. Prints of the Presidents and their families were popular ever since Washington. Printmakers from the end of the 18th century on issued prints of basically every President and his family so that people could hang these on the walls of their homes and offices. That is what your print is. You paid about the right price for this print, which is a nice one.

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  15. We have three Dutch children prints copyrighted by Joseph Hoover & sons 1904. Two have geese and pigs with the children. The third is in a frame with a windmill carved in the lower left hand corner and depicts a snow scene with a little Dutch girl with an umbrella and two little boys making snowballs to throw at her. Any idea of their history? or any other information you can give us?

    Thanks!

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  16. Over the past 40 years I have collected the Original Currier and Ives Lithographs of the Presidents with Red Curtain. I now have all of the Presidents - the complete collection. I am thinking of selling the collection. Is it more valuable as a collection, or should I sell them Lithographs individually?
    I look forward to your response and thank you for your time.

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  17. Interesting question. I think it is "way more cool" to have the complete set (do you have Franklin D. Roosevelt?), and one can argue that as a complete set it ought to have a premium, but it is generally harder to sell a large set of prints and it is harder to find someone to spend the amount of the group. On the other hand, while some Presidents sell quite quickly (like Lincoln or Jefferson) others are quite hard to sell.

    Just as a collectors thing I would try to sell them as a complete set, thinking not that you are going to in the end get more money, but that you won't be left with the few that are hard to sell. Also, it is really cool to have the complete set. We have sold them twice over the years and people really like it.

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  18. Hello, We own a J. Hoover which is stamped on the left bottom corner "Copyright 1893 by J. Hoover, Philada". The word "After" is written in watercolor paint above the signature of Francis Wheaton the artist of the original painting. The piece is without doubt watercolor throughout. It is painted on paperboard and it measures (does not include mat or frame) 21 1/2" x 13 1/2". Did J. Hoover sell watercolor copies of popular paintings by well know artist of the time and had them marked with the word "After" above the signature so as not to confuse them with the original? People think it's an original watercolor until we tell them that it is a copy. We have not found any other artist signature. It is in it's original goldgilt frame with original glass and mat, and it's condition is excellent. We were told a few years back that the value was around $800 as a copy of Francis Wheaton's painting. The original we know would be worth alot lot more. Can you please tell us if J. Hoover employed artist to paint copies?
    Any info you have would be appreciated. We are trying to make sure we know what we have should we try to sell it. We do not want to mislead anyone. We are aware of copies of famous paintings by other atist, today those are done by machine for the most part or made in China. Was Miss Wheaton that famous in her day? We have found a couple of sites that mention they have watercolor copies, we know of one other like ours and another painting by her of a different subject. The painting is of a woman in a field with sheep. Any info you might have regarding how the copies were made would be appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Lee

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  19. As far as we know, Hoover never employed nor commissioned artists like Francis Wheaton. Hoover did purchase paintings and watercolors by such artists and then have them reproduced. I am pretty sure that is what you have.

    On the whole Hoover produced chromolithographs, that is where the color was printed. These were intended to look as much as possible like the paintings or watercolors they reproduced, so without seeing it in person I would not want to rule out the possibility it is a chromolithograph even though it looks just like a watercolor.

    The other possibility is that it is a hand colored (watercolored) lithograph. They did issue those and that may be what you have.

    What is not, however, is an actual watercolor, nor is it--at least as best I can say with all I know about Hoover--a print which Wheaton herself worked on.

    There are very few Hoover prints which are worth as much as $800. Without seeing the print in person I certainly cannot say, but my suspicion is that that is a too high estimate of your prints value.

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  20. Hey there. I was wondering if i could ask your opinion on two prints of mine? They both have identical oak frames, but I took the second one out to see the date, and I think it says 1908, the fist one is water damaged and I can't quite see the date.

    http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a132/Lunix666/IMG_7080.jpg?t=1288575593

    http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a132/Lunix666/IMG_7082.jpg?t=1288575594

    Do you have an idea of value with the frames? angela.adams000@gmail.com

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  21. I HAVE A FRIEND THAT HAS A J. HOOVER PICTURE DATED 1808 BUT CAN'T FIND ANY INFO BACK THAT FAR
    ABOUT J. HOOVER

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  22. There are no J. Hoover prints from that date. The firm was not in existence then.

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  23. My mother has two Jos. Hoover & Son prints (copyright 1902) that belonged to her grandmother and wanted to know a rough estimate of the value of them.
    The first is of Autumn Blue Ridge in North Carolina and the print number is 1342 (this is printed on the top righthand corner)

    The Second also apears to be of North Carolina and has Summer Arizona 1356 printed on the top righthand side.

    She does not wish to sell them she simpley wants to know if they hold any monitary value. Any information would be most helpful.

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  24. As explained in the blog above, basically all Hoover prints have only what we call "decorative" value. They are attractive, so they do have some value, but they are not really "collector" prints.

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  25. Chris
    I have a jos hoover print dated 1909 by George Reicke of sheep grazing with trees in the backround and some sort of barn or building in the left back of picture. I read that these have mostly decorative value but does the presence of the artist give any more value? Also where would one go about getting this appraised?

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  26. The artist doesn't really affect the value of Hoover prints. It is nice to know, but the print still has only "decorative" value. I would not recommend spending to have this print appraised. It is a nice antique print and I would recommend simply enjoying it for what it is, not what you hope it might be worth.

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  27. My family has been in the Philadelphia area for longer than I am aware. As long as I can remember there has been this very small print of two dutch children (a girl and a a boy) in my family. I have kept it all these years. I would like to identify this little print's origins and the artist if possible. It is 2 3/4" wide and 3 1/4" in height. A small metal clasp is attached to the top of the print which is mounted on wood. The clasp has a patent no. ... but I'm sure that relates to the hardware and not the print. Any tips on how to find out more about this little print?

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  28. It is not clear from your query whether this is a Hoover print or not. However, it does seem that the print does not have an artist's name on it. That is not unusual for 19th century prints (or early 20th century) and this usually means that you will be lucky if you can find out more about it. The majority of popular prints from this period were based on art work by staff artists. It is usually impossible to know the name of these artists for they really were not considered "fine art," but simply decorative items. It is sort-of like trying to find the name of the person who designed a wall paper pattern; that is not considered important and often is not recorded. So, unless you can find your print illustrated somewhere, with an attribution of artist, you will probably never be able to find out much about it. This is too bad, but really most of these prints were produced to be hung in the home and enjoyed and it is usually a good idea simply to enjoy them for what they were intended to be.

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  29. I have a J Hoover & son print. It is black & white - Buck standing alone on right side. Doe and fawn standing on left. they are all standing on rocks. I can not find any information about it, including value. I found Highland Solitude 1740 printed on the bottom.

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  30. I have a J Hoover & Sons painting. It is of a house with a water-wheel on it. There are Children children floating a small sailboat in the water and in front of the house is a horse and small cart. At the bottom of the picture it says J Hoover and Sons 1897. Phil.
    Please let me know about this picture.
    F. Cordle

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  31. Chris,

    I have a print called "Winter Moonlight in Michigan", copyright 1894. Can you tell me anything about it? Did they run a series of different state winter prints? Thank you

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  32. I have never seen another Hoover print with such a state name, so I doubt they did a series. Really, as with most Hoover prints, there is not a lot to say about the individual print other than what you can say about all of their prints, as in the blog above.

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    1. I have a print titled "Winter Moonlight in Colorado 1343" Copyright 1908 by Jos Hoover and Sons Philadelphia. I've been looking for information on it. It seems maybe he did do a series with state names.?.

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  33. My Dad has a 1613 Baby's Frolic print from 1908 or 1909 by Jos Hoover and Son Philidelphia PA..Can you tell me how much this is worth? Or anything about it? Thank you.

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  34. I have found a Joseph Hoover Friends 1643 picture of a little girl in her white nightie along with a dog. The dog has a white face and deep eyes and a mane of fur. The print is delightful. do you know anything about the print?

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  35. As I have said above, there is usually not any specific information to provide about a particular Hoover print. All their prints were issued for the same purpose, viz. to be framed and hung in the home or office, but beyond that there is little to say. Few were signed as the artists usually were staff employees, so most often the only information one can provide is on the firm itself.

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    Replies
    1. In regard to the Hover print "Friends 1643", can you tell me when this one may have been printed as the copyright says 1900 - 190? (the last diget was torn off)

      Thank you for any information you can give me - Melvin

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  36. I ran across a painting signed CHANDLER. The back says copyright 1887 by Hoover and Sons. Is this painting valuable?

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  37. Hi,

    Question, I have a litograph from 1906 entitled 2 spirited horses...I can't find any information on it and from digging around it may have been done by Joseph Hoover and sons. Are you familiar with this print? I know you said that most of their prints today are worth decorative value, is that also the case with this particular lithograph assuming it was in fact done by this particular company?

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  38. I do not remember if Hoover did this print, but I think so. In any case, we do know the print and it has the same decorative value as most of the Hoover prints or similar prints of the period. Nice print, but still decorative value only.

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  39. Chris,
    I"ve got a J Hoover print that I'd like to have some info on. It"s a picture of a boy shooting a rifle along a creek and standing beside a row boat. Does anyone know the title of this print and the approx. age??? It has a beautiful frame with it and I got this from my grandmother. She says it came from her parents or my Great Grandparents. Thanks,

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  40. My J Hoover print has a number 75 on upper right corner if that helps.

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    Replies
    1. I have a similar print. Mine is in the orginial frame backboarded by Deuther Patented 1880. It has copyrighted by J. Hoover Philda on the watercolor. The print is of a boy with a rifle, cabins are in the distance by a pond. It seems to be winter, looks as if snow is on the ground. Have you any info yet? Tami
      Tami

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  41. I have a 1903 hoover and son print. Looks like a labrador retiever and some bird game. Any ideas of name or value??

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  42. I have a black and white picture of a barefoot young girl and her dog.
    I'm just trying to date it.

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  43. If there is no date on the print, there is no way to know the date it was published, but the blog above gives general dates for the firm and their work.

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  44. there is a copyright 1903 on it in the bottom right corner.

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  45. Then it would have been produced in 1903.

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  46. I have a framed picture of the "Courtship of Pricilla and John Alden 1634". There is a hand written paper taped on the back with "Copyright 1903 by Jos. Hoover & Son" Phila Penn
    Would it be possible for you to tell me anything about this print and what it might be worth. It is a very old and fragil frame..

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  47. We have a large winter scene in a well preserved ornate frame. In the lower left corner it says "Copyright 1900 by JOS. Hoover &Sons Philadelphia"
    and is signed in a downward slant "H.M.Ward". There is no title to be seen but it is quite lovely with a church, horses pulling a sleigh, a shimmering pond, a few houses and a prominent tree in the very center

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  48. I have a 1633 Pricilla and John Alden copyright (1903 0r 1908) by Jos Hoover and Sons Philadelphia, with a signature written in pencil on back of board. But it is very hard to make out could be Tugot?? Or J_ug_t. Not sure if the signature is authentic. The discription of painting is Pricilla and John Alden standing on a winter beach, he is holding a (muscat?) With trees behind them a row boat on the edge of sea and sail boat at the horizon. It is framed in a very fancy curvy large frame with flowers and vines.It is very damaged, would this be worth fixing? And have you heard of this artist before?

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  49. I have not heard of this artist and the name on the back may be an owner, not the artist. As Hoover prints have only decorative value when in great shape, it is rarely worth fixing them on a purely financial basis. If you love the print, there is no reason not to fix it, but don't do it with the idea that you are going to increase the value of the print more than you spend on the restoration.

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  50. I have a print marked Jos Hoover, but the copyright date is unfortunately broken off. The print is called "Strawberry Ripe" with a number 35 in front of it. I was curious if you might know roughly what date it would be. It was in my great x3 grandmother's kitchen and my wife says no way in our kitchen. Thanks!

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  51. If you read the blog above, that will give you a general idea of the dates the firm was making prints.

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  52. I have a picture titled Old Oaken Bucket with a number of 1328 after it. It was done by Joseph Hoover & Sons in Philadelphia, Pa and is dated 1897

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    1. I have a picture titled Old Oaken Bucket with a number of 1328 after it. It was done by Joseph Hoover & Sons in Philadelphia, Pa and is dated 1897. Any thoughts about the value?

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    2. As indicated above, essentially all Hoover prints have "decorative" value.

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  53. I have a picture titled Kentucky Maid and Her Pet (horse) copyright 1903 By Jos, Hoover & Son. The pcture is Black& White. It has been put up for years. I thought I wood take it apart and chean the glass. (I hate dirt) and I needed to reseal the back. I found a little shine on the dress. Do you know anything about the picture? There is a number 1546 beside the title.

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    Replies
    1. There really is not any information available about any Hoover prints specifically. This is a typical Hoover decorative prints. The shine could be either extra heavy ink to give it some texture or possibly gum arabic, which was sometimes added to lithographs to give the image some "depth."

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  54. I am researching a print for my mom. On back it had 16 3 friends Copyright 1904 JOS Hoover and Son Philadelphia. The picture is of a young girl with her arms wrapped around her dogs neck hugging it.

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  55. sorry, 1643 Friends, not 16 3 friends. thank you for any information.

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  56. i have a 1902 hoover @ sons titled The Cakewalk. i have seen anything on it. can u help? it is about 15 by 20

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  57. i meant to say i have never seen anything on it

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  58. As I have said several times above, for the majority of Hoover prints there is nothing to say except the general information on the firm, which is in the original blog. Most of their prints were simply decorative items with nothing to be said about them beyond that, and the history of the firm.

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  59. would it still be considered a print when it had a piece of metal fall off the top of the picture? this is in regard to the cakewalk. looks like something the studio used to catalog.

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  60. I have a print by Jos Hoover & Sons, 1729 chariot race.

    So nice to view, view and turn your head again and again!

    We enjoy it! Does anyone here know of this one? Thanks in advance.

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  61. I have a print by Jos Hoover & Sons called 1588 Intermission. Copywrite 1902. Do you have any information on this print?

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    Replies
    1. We have no information other than the general information above about the firm and their prints. This is true of most of their prints.

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  62. I have recently come into possession of a J.A. Garfield lithograph copyrighted 1881, by Kurz & Allison. The picture is of Garfield accompanied by his mother, wife, son and daughter. Appears to be original frame, and over the mothers head in the picture hangs a picture of what I would presume to be the family home. What kind of monetary value does this lithograph hold?

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    1. As I have said many times, this blog is not the place for appraisals. However, this print, like most of Hoover's has lowish "moderate" value. It is a nice enough print, but Garfield is not that popular a subject.

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    2. Found Jos Moover and Son lithograph, Lord Help Me 1649, signed and numbered, 1908, any information on this?

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  63. Hi Chris,

    I have tried to research the J Hoover print I have, and have found your blog very informative, do you have suggestions for me to find information on the print, I have found many of his prints, but not one that matches the one I have which is landscape and a water fall scene. It it still framed, and I don't think it was ever taken out of the frame, the frame still has the original wood slats in the back. A label on the frame, but it has worn off and I can only read the last 3 letters ber & Co thats all that is left. The print is not dated either. It is vertical and measures,25x13 inches. Where can I find more info on this?

    thanks
    Val

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  64. Wondering if you can help? Have several prints purchased at an estate sale at Bevan residence from The Philadelphia railroad around 30 years ago. One is of the Philadelphia White House(black/white)framed by wannamakers for Mr Bevan. Did not want to open backing since it was still in great condition. Told many years ago that Wyeth did the original copy and prints were made for Bevan. Do not know if this is true or if they are even worth anything.

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  65. Dear Mr. Lane,

    We have a "Christ Knocking at the Door" Numbered No 1907 or 1807 in a wood frame by Jos. Hoover and Sons Philadelphia. It is a chromolith in the original frame. It is in the original frame. Is there a way to research this?

    Thank you. Laura Vesely

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    Replies
    1. As I have indicatged above, there really isn't much to say about any particular Hoover print. They were mostly (like yours) done by staff artists and were intended as decoration for the American home in the late 19th to early 20th century.

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  66. I have Winter Moonlight, Iowa 1364. Copyright 1901 by J Hoover & Son Philada. H.M.Ward. I is in a large carved frame. Does anyone know anything about it?

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    1. I have Winter Moonlight in Colorado 1343. I Live in Iowa and would be interested in seeing the Iowa version. Would you be able to post a picture?

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  67. I found a print in a frame at an antique store with a woman on a porch playing what I think is a harpsichord and 2 pigeons on the ground is is copyrighted 1903 Jos Harper & son. If anyone has info on this I would love to hear it, Thanks!

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  68. I have a Hoover print of a shepherd with a small flock of sheep, barn and buildings in background, copyright 1894. Initials in lower left of print appear to be a W with a C superimposed. Any idea who the artist might be?

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  69. I have a 1900 copyright of Jos Hoover and Sons, Philadephia,the picture is 1508 The Playmates. What do think about this picture?

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  70. I have read your article and have read all these post, none mention anything about a GERMAN CHROMOLITHOGRAPH I have. bottom right corner says lith by j hoover philada dated 1892 mounted in an old wooden frame, the cool thing was the newspaper behind the wood was dated 1942 headline read the Nazi troops threaten and the offensive of Stalingrad begins, also the paper went on talking about bonds and other events like the sinking of an american destroyer by the Japan

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  71. I should mention It is a religious picture with what appears to be a nunn on her knees and a angel on her right and Jesus in front

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    1. You do not say what you mean by it being a "German chromolithograph." If it is by J. Hoover, then the print was made in the US. Is the title in German? I haven't seen a Hoover with a German title, but they might have issued them. Their prints could also have ended up in Germany in a number of ways, if someone bought it here, for instance, and took it back with them.

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  72. Did Joseph Hoover ever do oil paintings?

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  73. No. They did only prints. Because some of their prints were high quality chromolithographs, they may look like an oil painting, but they issued only prints.

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  74. Hi Chris, I have an antique print of some kind of lake or swamp with a little boat and a rookery or something behind (cant find the name of the print...) all it says is "copyright 1896 by J hover and son philada" and I can see something written on the bottom left looking like "Mart" or "Naro".. its hard to tell. Does this print has any value?

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    1. jean I have one similar and it says 884 THE OLD CASTLE at the top right of my border. It is dark and does look swampy with a man standing in the boat. I have been unable to find any information on the artist, but after reading Chris Lanes replies I would assume it was a staff artist and we wont find anything

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  75. Read your Blog posts and enjoyed the background about J. Hoover. Our Print is "Sailing Ships" and is black & white. It has a Artist name: Melville Thornley and below 1863 J. Hoover, Philadephia. Just would like to know the Title and if the Artist did anything in addition to this print?

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  76. Hi Chris,

    I have a J. Hoover of General Robert E Lee in an oval very decorative gold wood frame. The back has an exposed inset canvas with stenciling that states:
    J. HOOVER,
    PUBLISHER (curved)
    S04
    Market St.
    PHILAD'A.

    There are some wearing marks in two places on the portrait but otherwise it is quite attractive. Can you tell me an approximate value range on this piece.

    Thanks, Ron

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  77. I have read the previous entries and your responses to them, and I understand that the J Hoover & Sons chromolithographs are not really worth much for the most part. My question is, If there is an artists name on the print is it worth any more. I have 2 chromolithographs Copyrighted 1904 by Jos. Hoover & Sons and they also have an artists signature of Carl Weber.
    Thanks,
    Darlene

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  78. Hoover prints can have some "moderate" value, as they are decorative and of nice quality; they just do not have "significant" value. The signature of the artist makes no difference to their value, as none of the artists who worked for Hoover are particularly collectible. Their value depends on their appearance, appeal and condition.

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  79. Hi, I have a picture apprx. 26" X 16" titled, "1707 Little Musician" with a "Copyright 1904 By Jos. Hoover & Son, Philadelphia" in lower right hand corner. It does have damage. It was in a gesso frame. Any idea if it is of value. Thanks

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  80. I have a Jos Hoover & Son print "1651 A Pleasant Nook". It's a springtime picture of a girl sitting on a fence and a man with a cow walking down the country lane. It's in an ornate frame. Do you have any information about this particular print?

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    1. Chris, can you tell me anything about the print 1651 A Pleasant Nook? Thanks!

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    2. There really isn't anything to say about most particular Hoover prints that is not stated above. They were usually done by staff artists and all had the same purpose, viz. to be decorative items to hang in the home. All you can say is that and then general information about the firm, which is given above.

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  81. I have a piece entitled "Drake & Duck", copyright, 1905, J. Hoover 7 Son, and it is mounted in a nicely finished serving tray with brass handles? Any information on this piece?

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    1. This is a reproduction, not an original (unless someone who owned the print glued it to a tray). Hoover's company never used their prints for trays.

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  82. I have a piece entitled "Her Pet" copyright, 1903 is there any value in this? if so where can I resale the picture?

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    1. As with most Hoover prints, it has "decorative" value.

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  83. I have a J. Hoover & Son Phila. 1899 print by F. Earl Christy, which he would have done when he was 17. I recently saw the 'sister' print of this sell for $825. so I'm thinking this could be an exception to the 'rule' that Hoover didn't commission great artists. Christy is collectible, mostly for his postcards and magazine covers, so I'm expecting that this print is somewhat valuable.

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  84. Hoover print 1896 signed by W. Carlton. Print has 4 cows standing in a field with some trees. Beautiful frame - after reading all comments sounds like just decorative value?

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    1. Yes. That is true for almost all Hoover prints. This doesn't mean it isn't worth something, just that its value comes from what it looks like, not by being a collector's print.

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  85. I have a print in original frame. Lower right on print is copyright 1900, Jos Hoover and Sons Philadelphia lower left 1611. Little scotchman's story.. Does this have any value??

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    1. As with most Hoover prints, it has "decorative" value.

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  86. I have a J. Hoover framed. On the back is a newspaper clipping that is dated July 15, 1901. I am unable to see the edges of the art. My question is should I attempt to take it out of the frame?

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    1. No reason not to as long as you are careful. It probably needs conservation in any case, as most old framing jobs were not done "properly" (that is to preserve the print).

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  87. Hi! I have a lithograph of Joseph Hoover & Son with copyright of 1904. The name of the lithograph is "Nose out of Joint". It deplicts a mother holding an infant and a young female child standing behind her looking rather jealous of the infants attention. Also another older female standing behind the little girl. Could you tell me if this is worth anything?

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    1. As with most Hoover prints, it has "decorative" value.

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  88. I have an 8 x 11 1/2 painting of two families by M De Munkacsy. Is there any value?

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    1. As with most Hoover prints, it has "decorative" value.

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